Monday, January 22, 2018

The World is Their Oyster!

The World is Their Oyster!

January 1, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

At Harbor School on Governors Island, you’re either a rower or a sailor, and competition is fierce between the two. Rowers in their speedy craft scoff at sailors’ wind-powered vessels, while sailors threaten to tip their adversaries in the water with a spin of the wheel. Such good-natured trash talk is evidence of the passion […]

Shining a Light on History – The National Lighthouse Museum Opens on Staten Island

Shining a Light on History – The National Lighthouse Museum Opens on Staten Island

January 1, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

On August 7, 1789, George Washington signed the National Lighthouse Act, placing all the new nation’s lighthouses, buoys, coastal beacons, and other navigational aids under the federal government’s control. Exactly 225 years later, a group of historians and mariners celebrated the unveiling of the National Lighthouse Museum, an institution on Staten Island dedicated to preserving […]

October 2014 Featured Writer

October 2014 Featured Writer

October 1, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Kat Long is a freelance journalist focused on science and the environment. Her work has appeared in Grist and Coastal Commons, the online magazine of Going Coastal, Inc. Follow her on Twitter at @kat_long or check out her blog, katlong.com (photo by Maro Hagopian).

July 2014 Featured Writer

July 2014 Featured Writer

July 1, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Kat Long is a freelance journalist focused on science and the environment. Her work has appeared in Grist and Coastal Commons, the online magazine of Going Coastal, Inc. Follow her on Twitter at @kat_long or check out her blog, katlong.com (photo by Maro Hagopian).

Ahead of the Game

Ahead of the Game

July 1, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

. Clad in a black windproof suit, gray rubber boots, and red life jacket, Geoff McKnight looked more like a deep-sea diver than an urban sailor. On a brisk and breezy morning at the Monmouth Boat Club in Red Bank, New Jersey, McKnight and his two crew mates prepared to sail in an annual regatta. […]

Coastal Conundrum

Coastal Conundrum

June 1, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Like Earth, the oceans are not flat. Currents and water temperatures can change the face of the seas, causing them to rise and fall over years or decades. A worldwide warming climate plays a big part in the future of coastal communities, but what exactly does sea level rise mean, and is there anything that […]

The Deal with Seals

The Deal with Seals

February 1, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

. One brisk morning, the western end of Westhampton Island appeared deserted, except for a handful of hardy hikers at Cupsogue Beach County Park. The expanse of windswept dunes, gnarled pitch pines, and exposed beach was less than hospitable for most humans, but it served as a sandy Shangri-La for local seals. Every year, four […]

Sea Change for Jamaica Bay

Sea Change for Jamaica Bay

February 1, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Jamaica Bay has played many roles in the lively history of New York. The fertile marshes provided rich fishing grounds for Lenape Indians, and the tides gave power to the Dutch gristmills along its banks. The waters teemed with bass, weakfish, flounder, and oysters; migratory birds gathered to rest and recharge for their long journeys […]

Long Island Lobsters Reveal Clues to Climate Change

Long Island Lobsters Reveal Clues to Climate Change

November 1, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Could sentinel monitoring help head off an environmental calamity? The first hint came in the summer of 1999 when lobstermen, expecting a bumper haul of crustaceans, instead started finding sick and dead lobsters in their traps. As the months wore on, the traps bore more dead specimens than live ones, and the catastrophe became clear. […]

Helping the Gowanus Canal Come Clean

Helping the Gowanus Canal Come Clean

September 1, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Helping the Gowanus Canal Come Clean Aquatic robot aids effort to save polluted NYC waterway Peering into the opaque, olive-toned water of Brooklyn’s Gowanus Canal from the safety of my canoe, I spotted patches of lavender oil speckling the surface. Clumps of unidentifiable garbage floated past my paddle. Up ahead, pedestrians crossing the Union Street […]